The Ultimate Fire Protection Engineering PE Exam Resources List

Currently NCEES.org does not show a list of Fire Protection Engineering PE Exam Resources. They do provide a link to the Society of Fire Protection Engineers website which includes Suggested References for the 2017 Principles and Practice of Engineering (PE) Exam in Fire Protection.

I have assembled these resources from the past years helping others to prepare for and take the Fire Protection Engineering PE Exam.

Fire Protection Engineering PE Exam Resources

This is not a list of required standards and documents that must be taken to the exam. Your personal experience and expertise will dictate which resources can serve you best on exam day and should be included in your Test-Day Resource Library©.

Test-Day Resource Library

The Test-Day Resource Library© is one of the most valuable tools you can use while preparing for the exam and on exam day.

Each person’s own resource library will be different from every other person’s.

When I coach people on building their Fire Protection Engineering PE Exam Resource Library, I have them start with an honest assessment of their needs.

For example:

  • if they don’t have a background or experience in carbon dioxide, chemical and inert clean agents, wet and dry chemical, or foam fire protection systems,
    • then we don’t spend time on Special Hazard Systems and,
    • they don’t include NFPA 30 in their Fire Protection Engineering PE Exam Resources
  • if they have limited knowledge in suppression, inerting, isolation, venting, containment, and damage-limiting construction,
    • then we spend time only on those topics they are familiar with and,
    • they include only those sections of NFPA 69 that pertain to them

Through this process, we narrow down the number of resources that must be assembled, tagged, transported to the exam site, and used during the test.

My advice, look through the list below and decide for yourself what makes sense.


The Ultimate Fire Protection Engineering PE Exam Resources List:

SFPE Handbook of Fire Protection Engineering, Fifth Edition
(Amazon.com: SFPE Handbook of Fire Protection Engineering, Fifth Edition)
Society of Fire Protection Engineers
www.sfpe.org

Reference/Answer Manual for the P.E. Exam in FPE, Fourth Edition
(Amazon.com: Reference/Answer Manual for the P.E. Exam in FPE, Fourth Edition)
Society of Fire Protection Engineers
www.sfpe.org

NFPA Fire Protection Handbook
(Amazon.com: NFPA Fire Protection Handbook)
National Fire Protection Association
www.nfpa.org

NFPA 1 – Fire Code, 2015 Edition
(Amazon.com: NFPA 1)
National Fire Protection Association
www.nfpa.org

NFPA 13 – Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems, 2016 Edition
(Amazon.com: NFPA 13)
National Fire Protection Association
www.nfpa.org

NFPA 14 – Standard for the Installation of Standpipe and Hose Systems, 2016 Edition
(Amazon.com: NFPA 14)
National Fire Protection Association
www.nfpa.org

NFPA 25 – Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems
(Amazon.com: NFPA 25)
National Fire Protection Association
www.nfpa.org

NFPA 30 – Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code, 2015 Edition
(Amazon.com: NFPA 30)
National Fire Protection Association
www.nfpa.org

NFPA 69 – Standard on Explosion Prevention Systems, 2014 Edition
(Amazon.com: NFPA 69)
National Fire Protection Association
www.nfpa.org

NFPA 72 – National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code, 2016 Edition
(Amazon.com: NFPA 72)
National Fire Protection Association
www.nfpa.org

NFPA 101 – Life Safety Code®
(Amazon.com: NFPA 101)

NFPA 101 – Life Safety Code® Handbook
(Amazon.com: NFPA 101 Handbook)
National Fire Protection Association
www.nfpa.org

International Building Code, 2012
(Amazon.com: IBC, 2012)
International Code Council
www.iccsafe.org


That should get you started.

Remember, the information and resources you need on the exam will look different than those of the people around you.

That’s ok.

Your #1 priority is to pass the test and get your PE.

  • Using the most, or the least, or the currently popular resources doesn’t count on your test score.
  • You don’t get extra credit for preparing like everyone else.
  • They won’t give you a PE license for conforming to some “standard” form of preparation.

Do what works for you and you will be successful.

If there is anything I can do for you, please do not hesitate to ask.

To Your Success …

Jeff Setzer, PE
Fire Protection Engineering PE Exam Resources

If you have any questions or comments about this topic or about the PE Exam in general, please do not hesitate to contact me.
I’d also appreciate your feedback on this post.

Fire Protection Engineering PE Exam Resources

Fire Protection Engineering PE Exam Resource Library

>NCEES

Fire Protection Hazard Analysis

Fire Protection Hazard Analysis
for the Fire Protection Engineering PE Exam

Fire Protection Hazard Analysis
Fire Protection Hazard Analysis questions on the Fire Protection Engineering PE Exam will focus on:

  • Building Systems (electrical, mechanical)
  • Construction Materials
  • Room Dimensions and Arrangement in the Building
  • Building Contents (flammable liquids, high-piled storage)
  • Sources of Combustion Air
  • Position and Location of Doors
  • Characteristics of Occupants (numbers and locations)

From Fire Hazard Analysis Techniques
The goal of a fire hazards analysis is to determine the expected outcome of a specific set of conditions called a fire scenario. The fire scenario includes details – such as those listed above – that have an effect on the outcome of interest.
Fire Protection Hazard Analysis

  1. Select a target outcome. Some examples are:
    • avoid or limit occupant fatalities in the building
    • minimize the potential for the occurrence of fire
    • no release of hazardous material to threaten health, safety, or the environment
    • no undue hazards to the public from fire
    • building safety systems are not damaged by fire
    • property damage does not exceed acceptable levels
  2. Determine the scenario of concern by using:
    • records of past fires, either for the specific building or for similar buildings or class of occupancy
    • statistical data from NFPA or from the National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) on ignition sources, first items ignited, rooms of origin, etc.
  3. Select an appropriate method for prediction of growth rates:
    • Develop the Design Fire Curve – represents the heat release rate over time for the fire in question:
      • The design fire curve can be divided into four phases:
        1. ignition
        2. growth
        3. steady-burning
        4. decay
    • Predict the Fire Effects:
      • a realistic prediction of detector and sprinkler activation
      • time to start of evacuation
      • time to initial exposure of occupants
    • Fire Hazard Calculations:
      • Radiant Heat Flux – a measure of the rate of radiative heat transfer per unit area
      • Smoke Production
      • Fire Plumes and Ceiling Jet Temperatures and Velocities
      • Species Production – toxic or corrosive products of combustion:
        • carbon dioxide (CO2)
        • water vapor (H2O)
        • carbon monoxide (CO)
      • Depth of Upper Layer – estimate of the smoke layer velocity of descent
      • Toxicity – toxic gases produced by a fire
    • Computer Models
  4. Calculate the required time for occupants to move to a safe location:
  5. Analyze the impact of exposure of occupants or property to the effects of the fire:
  6. Examine the uncertainty in the Fire Protection Hazard Analysis:
    • Uncertainty analysis refers to dealing with the unknowns and variations:
      • assumptions in the models and the accurate representation of the input data
      • variability of any population of real people
    • the intent is to select design fires that provide a worst likely scenario
  7. Document the Fire Protection Hazard Analysis process:
    • include a discussion of uncertainty addressing the accurate representation of the data used and the sensitivity of the results to data and assumptions made

Fire Protection Hazard Analysis

NCEES